Locations

SPRINGWOOD

Ph: 1-3000-PAINS
      1-3000-72467
Fax: (07) 3209 4833

Get Directions

Hot Topic

Quick Links

  1. Trigger Point Massage
  2. Proactive Rehabilitation
  3. Sitting - the silent enemy!
  4. Healthy Office Tips
  5. Basketball Warm Up
  6. AFL Warm Up
  7. AFL Injuries in Juniors

Topics

  1. Trigger Point Massage

    Trigger Point Massage

    Trigger Point Massage

    What is a Trigger Point?

    • A trigger point (TP) is a section of muscle which has shortened/tightened due to overactivity
    • TP’s are present throughout the body and may be latent (no symptoms) or active
    • An active TP causes pain due to the muscle shortening.  This may be local or referred pain
    • The shortened portion of muscle is unable to contract and hence strength is reduced
    • TP’s present as a palpable lump in a muscle


    How are TP’s Managed?

    Trigger Point Release via…

    1. Massage
    2. Accupuncture needling (superficial or deep)


    TIME:
    15-20 minutes hands-on with 10-15minutes of guided stretch afterwards

    EXPECTATIONS:
    Will involve some discomfort however relief will be evident within the session.

     Benefits of TP Massage

    • Muscle lengthening
    • Pain reduction
    • Improved strength
    • Injury prevention


    Follow Up 

    To be guided by the physiotherapist - dependant on many variables!  

    Downloads
    TRIGGER_POINTS.pdf

    back to top

  2. Proactive Rehabilitation

    Proactive Rehabilitation

    Proactive Rehabilitation
     
    Gone are the days when injuries are treated with bed rest! Evidence today shows a strong correlation between fitness and activity levels and recovery from injury.
     
    How does exercise help?

    • Exercise has been shown to;
    • Increase blood flow/oxygen to muscles
    • Decrease waste products in muscles
    • Improve heart/lung function
    • Increase strength/endurance/flexibility in muscles exercised

    These benefits of exercise all combine to accelerate the healing process.

    What forms of exercise are most suitable?
    Most importantly, the activity must not reproduce the symptoms of the injury. It should also be something you enjoy and can do with a friend.
    Suggested activities include:

    • Walking
    • Riding (push bike/stationary bike
    • Swimming Exercise in the pool (hydrotherapy)
    • Cross training machines at the gym

    How often should this be done?

    Ideally 20 - 30mins/day would ensure the greatest benefits. However setting aside 30mins 3 – 4 times a week is a good compromise given the busy lives we lead.

    Remember, this is only a part of the healing process. There will be certain activities to avoid and certain other areas to target. However, maintaining or improving fitness levels is a key component to injury management. We must be proactive in our rehabilitation.

    Downloads
    PROACTIVE_REHABILITATION.pdf

    back to top

  3. Sitting - the silent enemy!

    Sitting - the silent enemy!

    Sitting – The Silent Enemy

    A position common in everyone's day to varying degrees, is sitting. This position places increased load on the neck and lower back regardless of whether we sit with good posture or not. This is due to the direct compressive effects of gravity on a ’ flexed spine’. Forces tend to ‘bow’ the spine forwards, (especially when we slump!) which stresses the tendons, ligaments and discs. In addition to this pressure our muscles adapt to this sedentary position. Certain muscles shorten and others weaken. Everyday activities (like lifting and putting on shoes) become more difficult due to these changes. The more we sit, the more these adaptations occur and the more prone to injury we are.

    It normally isn’t until you have experienced a sore neck or back that we realise the stress sitting creates on those areas!

    Because sitting is fundamental to our lives it is important we take steps to ensure it doesn’t impede our every day function.

    Problems

    • It is essential for us to sit for certain periods during the day.
    • It is nearly impossible to sit with good posture all the time.

    Solutions

    • Try not to sit for periods greater than 1 hour at a time. A quick drink breaks does wonders for the muscles and mind as well!
    • A few simple exercises at the end of the day help reverse the effects of sitting. Ask today!
    • Never go straight from sitting into physical activity or heavy lifting. A gentle warm up should precede to eliminate risk of injury
    • Make sure the chairs/lounges/cars you sit in offer enough lower back (lumbar) support. If it doesn’t there are some easy modifications that can be made
    Downloads
    SITTING_-_THE_SILENT_ENEMY.pdf

    back to top

  4. Healthy Office Tips

    Healthy Office Tips

    HEALTHY OFFICE TIPS

    1. Push chest out and squeeze shoulder blades together for 10sec every 1/2 hr
    2. Stand up and move around for greater than 2mins every 1/2 hr where possible
    3. Arch upper body over the back of a chair to reverse the ‘slumping posture’ regularly
    4. At the end of the day: Lie on your back with a rolled up towel down the centre of the spine (and your head on a pillow) for greater than 5 mins. It should be relaxing and again, reverse the ‘slumping posture’!
    5. Sit for less time outside of work hours
    6. Take the stairs not the lift….if possible!
    Downloads
    HEALTHY_OFFICE_TIPS.pdf

    back to top

  5. Basketball Warm Up

    Basketball Warm Up

     Basketball Warm Up

    • Jog 2 laps of court
    • 10 Squats
    • 20 Calf Pumps
    • 10metres lunge walking
    • Two foot jumping on spot
    • Single leg star hopping exercise
    • 1 x  Suicide
    • 3 or 5 man weaves
    • Lay up drill
    • Shooting drills
    • 3min scrimmage


    Warm Down

    • Stretches (2x30sec each muscle)
      • Calves
      • Quads
      • Glutes
      • Hamstrings


    Injury Management

    ** To be implemented immediately with any injury

    R - Rest (Avoid any activities which aggravate the injury)
    I - Ice (20min On, 20min Off)
    C - Compression (Via tubular bandage)                      
    E - Elevation (Above the level of the heart)
    R - Referral (To appropriate health care professional - physio, Dr, Surgeon)

    Downloads
    BASKETBALL_WARM_UP.pdf

    back to top

  6. AFL Warm Up

    AFL Warm Up

    Australian Rules Football Warm Up 

    • 1 lap Jog - 1/2 way through the lap: Calf pumps (1min)
    • End of the Lap: Squats, lunges, arm circles, push ups, back rolls
    • Run Throughs (30m): High knees, leg flicks, side stepping, 75% effort
    • Leg swings: straight and across body
    • Lane work Handballing
    • 2mins for any extra individual stretching
    • Run throughs (60m): 20m build up, 20m max effort, 20 slow down
    • Lane work kicking:  Increase distance through the drill


    Can add more and make longer but this should form the core of the warm up

    Warm Down

    • Stretches (2x30sec each muscle)
      • Calves
      • Quads
      • Glutes
      • Hamstrings


    Injury Management

    ** To be implemented immediately with any injury

    R - Rest (Avoid any activities which aggravate the injury)
    I - Ice (20min On, 20min Off)
    C - Compression (Via tubular bandage)                            
    E - Elevation (Above the level of the heart)

    R - Referral (To appropriate health care professional - physio, Dr, Surgeon

    Downloads
    AFL_WARM_UP.pdf

    back to top

  7. AFL Injuries in Juniors

    AFL Injuries in Juniors

    Injuries in Junior Australian Rules Footballers

    Most Common Injuries:

    • Lower back pain (Stress fracture not unusual)
    • Anterior knee pain (Osgood Schlatters Disease - jumpers knee)
    • Heel Pain (Severs disease)
    • Corks (Muscle haematoma - if left untreated cam easily develop into on of the above injuries)
    • Torn quadricep (Grade three tears can detach bone from the anterior hip!)
    • Lower abdominal/groin pain (Osteitis Pubis - more common in late teens)


    Contributing Factors:

    • Extrinsic
    • Training error (e.g. poor warm up/cool down, lack of appropriate   recovery)
    • Incorrect technique (e.g. kicking)
    • Inadequate equipment (e.g football boots)
    • Parent/peer pressure· Intrinsic
    • Prior injury
    • Inadequate conditioning
    • Anatomic mal-alignment (genetics!!)
    • GROWTH - Creates muscle imbalances


     Prevention:

    • Adequate warm up and cool down procedures
    • Player/parent/coach education
    • Proactive Therapy can come to your team for injury prevention clinics
    Downloads
    AFL_INJURIES.pdf

    back to top